Americans Deserve Federal Judges Who Will Fight for the Constitution

Preserving the American judicial system is a fundamental principle for all those who fight to defend the Constitution.

Our judicial branch limits the powers of the other branches of government and ensures justice for all, which is no small task.

This is why Congress should move forward with the 35 judges nominated for circuit and district court seats. To date, only four have been confirmed while qualified nominees are being held up by members in the Senate.

The United States Court of Appeals and United States District Courts are particularly vital to our justice system because these courts rule on cases that won’t make it to the Supreme Court, which is most cases. The Supreme Court hears only about 100 to 150 of the 7,000 to 8,000 appeals it’s asked to review each year.

Most appeals courts consist of three judges and, unlike trial court, do not use a jury—making the judges’ responsibility even greater. The circuit court’s role is often described as fulfilling three functions: correcting the errors of trial courts, developing legal precedent and safeguarding justice.

In addition to the appellate courts are the U.S. district courts. These are trial courts that hear both civil and criminal cases. There is at least one district court in every state and Washington, DC – 94 in total. They’re the first line of the federal court system, funneling cases to the appellate court and ultimately the Supreme Court.

 

These courts bear the majority of federal cases, and their importance can’t be overstated. It’s the job of these judges to faithfully support the Constitution without legislating from the bench based on their own opinions. It’s the job of lawmakers in Congress to ensure that judges who respect the rule of law and the Constitution are holding the gavel, rather than judges who work outside of their role and legislate from the bench. The American people deserve a fair judicial system not disrupted by judges attempting to use their power for political gain.